Randy Travis Found The True Miracle…

Vlog 14 v7

Randy Travis Found The True Miracle pixie dust

I saw Randy Travis interviewed by Dan Rather ….on The Big Interview…. last month  

Randy Travis suffered a stroke in 2013 and he was very close to death. God was with him… and pulled him out the stroke ….a few weeks later.

With lifetime sales in excess of 25 million, Randy Travis was one of the biggest record sellers of all time …and a recent inductee …into the Country Music Hall of Fame…. class of 2016.  

Randy Travis Was A Different Person

Before he suffered a stroke, ….he divorced his wife  DA  I won’t  comment on that DA  

He had a girlfriend, Mary, and she stood by him …when the stroke nearly took his life when he suffered a stroke.  She didn’t have to…she just did it.  And she married him AFTER he had the stroke!

Mary Was A True Saint After He Suffered A Stroke

Mary is a TRUE saint.

It was amazing to watch after he suffered a stroke.  Dan Rather would ask him a question.  He would think about it,…. but got this look in his eye that he was trying, but just couldn’t get the words together.  She would quickly answer the question asked …of him.

DA Dan Rather didn’t say“I asked Randy, so you be quite.” DA

Everything ….was about HIM After He Suffered A Stroke

Everything ….was about HIM after he suffered a stroke.  And she kept on saying ….what a wonderful …voice he had.

Mary would keep saying ….that Randy was a miracle. … But I think the true miracle …was Mary.

Jill

This reminded me a lot of Jill, my wife after I suffered a stroke.   You can go to my video on (www.lifeafterthestroke.com  Show son the screen how to do it) and watch how Jill answered so quickly …for me.  I am in awe when I think about what she did for me ….all those years (jill is an angel)…without making it about her. I don’t tell her enough how remarkable she really is!

I am lost for words when I realize what Mary, Jill, (National Stroke Association, get help now) and countless others… have done…. caring for their loved one ….and NEVER making it about themTHEY…our caregivers… are the true heroes!

My Son Picked An Incredible Bride!

My Son Got Married  Pixie Dust  Picture of Holding hands

Tom picture of couple got married a few days ago because Who Gordon Viggiano would ever believe this?  PAUSE   Not me!

When I had my stroke 12 years ago;, PAUSE  my son Tom became….. VERY ….distant to me.

Fortunately, PAUSE my wife Jill had a GREAT relationship with my son Tom.  PAUSE How good is it…   you may ask?  

Tom drives home from the army base he is stationed  at, PAUSE  and he calls his mother …   everyday PAUSE That make me look bad.

My Son Loved My Mom

My mother was fantastic and she was awesome alive. I use to call her once a week ( on Saturday)  and I thought that was great!  

Another angle Nope!

For example, we met Bethany a few months ago…before they were engaged PAUSE  and we really… liked her. So that concluded at least we weren’t surprised when we met her a few days before the wedding! We had the privilege  of meeting her parents; John and Laura were great people and they did an excellent job raising her.

My Son Did A Great Job With Bethany

John did talk to me and I really enjoyed learning about his business.  PAUSE  What did I like most about John? PAUSE  He didn’t argue with the bride when she went into a panic… trying to  preparing for the biggest day in her life PAUSE  No… he would  hug her and told her everything was going workout fine. PAUSE I admired that.

A person that Bethany used to baby sit for in her younger days…. New angle last year. angle When Bethany told her about her wedding, she insisted that we have the wedding at HER house. You wouldn’t believe how blessed we were to be at such a spectacular home.  While they were away, PAUSE  their daughter was at the house and put out Prosseco and appetizers; PAUSE it was a fantastic venue! 

Kind People

The person who officiated the wedding PAUSE got his certificate by answering 3 questions PAUSE  and paying $50 dollars… PAUSE so it was official! PAUSE  The mother, Laura, then read a verse in the bible, PAUSE which was very moving. 

Tom Is Turning Around?

My son Tom must have distanced himself LESS from me;  He Is the Tom I used to know. 

The wedding bride and groom was beautiful; Different angle I cried! Different angle

When the wedding was over, …they were married.  PAUSE  Most of the attendees, about 11 of them, had cake at their little apartment, along with the 3 dogs… and a cat. PAUSE   Congrats Tom & Bethany!!

No Shave November

You may notice something different about me. PAUSE  I am celebrating No Shave November.

Back a few years ago, No Shave November the morning TV new anchors all celebrated No Shave November.

PAUSE No more.    I guess they have other concerns Man with beard not cancer. PAUSE  

But I still celebrate. It’s time to put down your razors, No Shave November scissors or clippers … PAUSE  and grow out your hair for cancer prevention. No-Shave November is a month-long campaign to raise awareness and funding for cancer prevention, research and education.  I made my donation; I hope you will too!

How about this….

What if I become a blogger?

I can write about what others are doing…relating to stroke recovery…and how OTHERS can benefit.

I THINK I had this idea before, but I am not sure; you know the reasons!  If I just blogged about it…and silenced my voice, I would hit all the items on my list.

Regarding the list: when the pandemic hit around Covid-19, I had sometime to think about what is next. I looked at new sites, and thought I could add value. I found this one lifeafterthestroke.com where I could add what I learned.  I have it parked on my website (www.mybrainllc.com) until I figured out what to do next.

I will share with you what I wrote down and how I reached the conclusion of what I want to do next.

What CAN I do?

  • Ask questions (I am really good at asking other about their problems)
  • Get people to talk
  • Get people to open up
  • Positive outlook
  • I always smiling

What CAN’T I do?

  • Talk ( I CAN’T talk about myself…even if I have prepared)
  • Talk to people who have communication issues
  • Talk to people who want ME to talk
  • Think clearly

What do I want to do NEXT?

  • What if I could stay in my home and work?
  • What if I could write; it may TAKE a little longer (and the grammar would be simple text), but I could do it.
  • Who would want to talk to me?
  • How can I get them to reach out?
  • Think about the people who have reached out.  How did I handle that?
  • What if I became a blogger about stroke recovery??
  • Could I think of new ideas?
  • What if I added items from other sites?
  • Could I start collecting them?
  • What if I just stayed on my site and did this. Would anyone follow?
  • How do I build followers? 
  • Offer program to stroke survivors through hospitals??

That’s it: I could be a blogger!

  • Work from home EVERYDAY
  • I can write about what interests me
  • No more travel…it  was great for a while, but now it is time to do something else
  • I can now travel for fun…and to see my family

Stay tuned for my life as I branch out into the future; I am excited about what the future holds and how I can transition my site.  I hope you will continue to follow me on my journey.

 

Aphasia…

It was October 2014 when I realized I had Aphasia.

I didn’t think about it much since then.  I wrote about it every year, but didn’t  take into accounted what it really meant.

You don’t realize how frustrating this REALLY is; I STILL can not get my words to come out correctly.

I will give you an example.  Yesterday, I spoke with my friend Keith, who is a fellow stroke survivor. I planned out my talk with him, because I wanted to be prepared.  In my notes, I had planned what I wanted to say… and read it over multiple times.  When Kieth called me, it want great. Then I wanted to explain why I wanted to talk; it was a disaster!!!  I taped the conversation (I will share if you would like to hear it) and I still can’t believe it!  I just mumbled my words and couldn’t get the correct meaning to come out.  Keith was gracious and he will let me know once he talks with his contacts. Keith is supposed to call me in a few weeks, but I don’t have my hopes up.  Really, I don’t think he  could understand why I called him.

How did this happen?  I want to do something different, but I can’t get it out.

What happens if I still can’t speak?  How do I work my way around that?  Regarding my plan in my October 2014 email: I still can’t do it (the scripting of calls)…even after 6 years!!! Look at what I said about Aphasia in October 2014.

I want to be of value; I just need a sign of what that will be.

Painful Blessing: Epilogue

Do you believe it?  The Epilogue is now complete!  Jill didn’t want to write another book, so she agreed to write this 5 page Epilogue: her reflection of what happened over the past 12 years.  Please send this to ANYBODY who has a book.  I hope the email has a BUNCH of likes and gets wildly distributed.  ENJOY!

Epilogue: Is It Over?  

by Jill Krantz Viggiano

We now rounded the twelve-year anniversary of Gordon’s stroke. It is hard to believe our lives have been changed so dramatically for such a long time. The funny thing is that, even after all these years, it still feels strange to me. I still feel out of step with normal life. I struggle to explain our life to anyone who asks the generic question “What do you do?” We aren’t “working,” we aren’t retired, we aren’t sick, we aren’t making any big plans. If I say I am my husband’s caregiver, it sounds like he is incapable of caring for himself and that makes me feel like I am minimizing his tremendous accomplishments in recovery. He does need me for many things and I am his caregiver, but we are more than that. I still haven’t found the right words.

We Decided To Move

We did not stay in our home in Lake Oswego. It became too much for me to maintain our big, beautiful house and yard. As it became clear that Gordon would never return to work, it also became clear that we could no longer afford that life. I remembered that night when Gordon was still in the hospital and I walked around our dark house, saying goodbye to everything we owned. Fortunately, our time there did not end the way I envisioned it that night, but it did end. Our home of 15 years, with our children’s heights marked on their bedroom doorways, is now occupied by a lovely couple who have become friends. They did not paint over our kids’ markings in an act of kindness. I still miss our friends, our neighbors, and our old life, but I know we did the right thing. Like everything else, our new home and our new life is good—different, but good.

Our children are all grown up. Gordon’s stroke and the radical change in our lives affected them both. Their trajectories I described in Chapter 15 have continued in many ways. Neither Rachel nor Tom like to talk about what happened.  They both still like to make fun of their dad when he messes up. Both pursue stability, order, and predictability. Both were happy we sold the house and moved to a new town. 

Rachel has spent much more time with us and seems to have made peace with all that happened. We each have a strong relationship with her. She certainly bears scars from all that happened but she seems to be healing nicely. 

From the beginning, Tom began to withdraw emotionally. Where there was once a warm, loving, sweet child, there became a cold, harsh, young man. I am happy to say that emotional wall he built to protect himself is slowly breaking down. It is always my hope and prayer that the wall will disappear completely. I hope his scars heal nicely too.

Recovery

I am happy to report that Gordon’s recovery continues! His fingers on his right hand began to move at the 4-year mark.  He was able to fully open his hand at the 8-year mark. We immediately rushed him into trying to shake hands with people he met. That created awkward moments as Gordon could only open his hand once, then it clamped shut again—tight. The poor sweet person on the other end of the handshake had to wait as we pried Gordon’s hand loose. At 10 years post-stroke, Gordon could open his hand twice, so handshaking has become possible without taking a prisoner. 

Weird Reflex

A weird reflex common in stroke survivors is that every time they yawn, their affected arm raises up into the air, like they are volunteering for something or are dying to ask a question. For all these years, Gordon yawns, the right arm goes up, and he tries to hold it down with his left arm, like a battle with a possessed limb. Once we got over the strangeness of it, we embraced it as comic relief. Here at the 12-year mark, that reflex is starting to diminish. Positive change is still happening. 

Gordon’s remaining deficits from the stroke have proven to be formidable obstacles. While he has improved dramatically, his cognition continues to be significantly impaired. Cognition refers to all the mental activities associated with thinking, knowing, remembering, and communicating. I often have to repeat myself when I introduce a new subject. At first, I thought he wasn’t hearing me. Now I suspect it is his ability to comprehend what is being said. His brain cannot focus on a new subject the way most of us do. He needs a moment, some context, and often a couple hearings to make sense of what is going on.

Conversation

Gordon is great at conversation—I say something (“What do you want for dinner?”), he says something (“Meat.”). But open-ended questions are difficult if not impossible for him. An open-ended question requires a response that follows logical order: a beginning, middle, and an end. We try to make a game of it when he is struggling to tell me something. He says whatever words he can get out, then he starts over and tries again. We laugh. By the third time I have heard enough to piece the response together. I tell him what I think he is trying to say and we laugh again at how hard it was to get those four or five sentences out in the right order and with the correct words.

The physical disabilities aren’t the big deal I thought they were going to be. We still work on his right arm and we keep active so we don’t lose ground with his right-side strength and coordination. It has become second nature to me to help Gordon with all the things that require two hands. I don’t mind helping and he is always appreciative.

My Life Now

 I rarely think of our pre-stroke life anymore. Once in a great while, my mind drifts to what our life might have been and I get that dull, sinking feeling of loss. It passes quickly as I remind myself of God’s generosity and care for us in bringing us to where we are now. We are healthy, we have a nice home, the bills are paid, we have all we need. All this is nothing short of a miracle. Who gets suddenly yanked out of normal life and career, has no ability to work ever again, and still has all he or she needs? We do, by the grace of our good Lord.

All those years ago, in the depths of my helplessness, I learned to fully surrender my life to Jesus. He has been faithful in His promise to care for us and to use our tragedy for good. We continue to do inspirational speaking around the country. We continue to engage with anyone who reaches out to us when they need encouragement in their struggle. It is gratifying to represent hope and possibility to those around us. 

Surrender

One of the greatest gifts of Surrender is contentment. I am not envious, I am not dissatisfied, I am not resentful. I am truly happy for others who are doing well. Forgiveness is easier. I don’t really worry. I am content. Life is short but my eternity is assured. I know I rest in God’s hand and one day I will see His smiling face. What could be better than that? 

While I am here on earth, it is my hope that I can bring joy with me wherever I go. I hope Gordon and I can be good examples of marriage and commitment. I hope we are a blessing wherever we happen to be. I hope the love of Jesus is obvious to anyone who interacts with me. I hope the pain we experienced only magnifies the blessings we have received. 

Pain and Blessing—Painful Blessing. Sounds like the perfect title for a book.
_____________

If you want to have a copy of the downloaded,  go HERE!

Painful Blessing: Epilogue

Do you believe it?  The Epilogue is now complete!  Jill didn’t want to write another book, so she agreed to write this 5 page Epilogue: her reflection of what happened over the past 12 years.  Please send this to ANYBODY who has a book.  I hope the email has a BUNCH of likes and gets wildly distributed.  ENJOY!

Epilogue: Is It Over?  

by Jill Krantz Viggiano

We now rounded the twelve-year anniversary of Gordon’s stroke. It is hard to believe our lives have been changed so dramatically for such a long time. The funny thing is that, even after all these years, it still feels strange to me. I still feel out of step with normal life. I struggle to explain our life to anyone who asks the generic question “What do you do?” We aren’t “working,” we aren’t retired, we aren’t sick, we aren’t making any big plans. If I say I am my husband’s caregiver, it sounds like he is incapable of caring for himself and that makes me feel like I am minimizing his tremendous accomplishments in recovery. He does need me for many things and I am his caregiver, but we are more than that. I still haven’t found the right words.

We Decided To Move

We did not stay in our home in Lake Oswego. It became too much for me to maintain our big, beautiful house and yard. As it became clear that Gordon would never return to work, it also became clear that we could no longer afford that life. I remembered that night when Gordon was still in the hospital and I walked around our dark house, saying goodbye to everything we owned. Fortunately, our time there did not end the way I envisioned it that night, but it did end. Our home of 15 years, with our children’s heights marked on their bedroom doorways, is now occupied by a lovely couple who have become friends. They did not paint over our kids’ markings in an act of kindness. I still miss our friends, our neighbors, and our old life, but I know we did the right thing. Like everything else, our new home and our new life is good—different, but good.

Our children are all grown up. Gordon’s stroke and the radical change in our lives affected them both. Their trajectories I described in Chapter 15 have continued in many ways. Neither Rachel nor Tom like to talk about what happened.  They both still like to make fun of their dad when he messes up. Both pursue stability, order, and predictability. Both were happy we sold the house and moved to a new town. 

Rachel has spent much more time with us and seems to have made peace with all that happened. We each have a strong relationship with her. She certainly bears scars from all that happened but she seems to be healing nicely. 

From the beginning, Tom began to withdraw emotionally. Where there was once a warm, loving, sweet child, there became a cold, harsh, young man. I am happy to say that emotional wall he built to protect himself is slowly breaking down. It is always my hope and prayer that the wall will disappear completely. I hope his scars heal nicely too.

Recovery

I am happy to report that Gordon’s recovery continues! His fingers on his right hand began to move at the 4-year mark.  He was able to fully open his hand at the 8-year mark. We immediately rushed him into trying to shake hands with people he met. That created awkward moments as Gordon could only open his hand once, then it clamped shut again—tight. The poor sweet person on the other end of the handshake had to wait as we pried Gordon’s hand loose. At 10 years post-stroke, Gordon could open his hand twice, so handshaking has become possible without taking a prisoner. 

Weird Reflex

A weird reflex common in stroke survivors is that every time they yawn, their affected arm raises up into the air, like they are volunteering for something or are dying to ask a question. For all these years, Gordon yawns, the right arm goes up, and he tries to hold it down with his left arm, like a battle with a possessed limb. Once we got over the strangeness of it, we embraced it as comic relief. Here at the 12-year mark, that reflex is starting to diminish. Positive change is still happening. 

Gordon’s remaining deficits from the stroke have proven to be formidable obstacles. While he has improved dramatically, his cognition continues to be significantly impaired. Cognition refers to all the mental activities associated with thinking, knowing, remembering, and communicating. I often have to repeat myself when I introduce a new subject. At first, I thought he wasn’t hearing me. Now I suspect it is his ability to comprehend what is being said. His brain cannot focus on a new subject the way most of us do. He needs a moment, some context, and often a couple hearings to make sense of what is going on.

Conversation

Gordon is great at conversation—I say something (“What do you want for dinner?”), he says something (“Meat.”). But open-ended questions are difficult if not impossible for him. An open-ended question requires a response that follows logical order: a beginning, middle, and an end. We try to make a game of it when he is struggling to tell me something. He says whatever words he can get out, then he starts over and tries again. We laugh. By the third time I have heard enough to piece the response together. I tell him what I think he is trying to say and we laugh again at how hard it was to get those four or five sentences out in the right order and with the correct words.

The physical disabilities aren’t the big deal I thought they were going to be. We still work on his right arm and we keep active so we don’t lose ground with his right-side strength and coordination. It has become second nature to me to help Gordon with all the things that require two hands. I don’t mind helping and he is always appreciative.

My Life Now

 I rarely think of our pre-stroke life anymore. Once in a great while, my mind drifts to what our life might have been and I get that dull, sinking feeling of loss. It passes quickly as I remind myself of God’s generosity and care for us in bringing us to where we are now. We are healthy, we have a nice home, the bills are paid, we have all we need. All this is nothing short of a miracle. Who gets suddenly yanked out of normal life and career, has no ability to work ever again, and still has all he or she needs? We do, by the grace of our good Lord.

All those years ago, in the depths of my helplessness, I learned to fully surrender my life to Jesus. He has been faithful in His promise to care for us and to use our tragedy for good. We continue to do inspirational speaking around the country. We continue to engage with anyone who reaches out to us when they need encouragement in their struggle. It is gratifying to represent hope and possibility to those around us. 

Surrender

One of the greatest gifts of Surrender is contentment. I am not envious, I am not dissatisfied, I am not resentful. I am truly happy for others who are doing well. Forgiveness is easier. I don’t really worry. I am content. Life is short but my eternity is assured. I know I rest in God’s hand and one day I will see His smiling face. What could be better than that? 

While I am here on earth, it is my hope that I can bring joy with me wherever I go. I hope Gordon and I can be good examples of marriage and commitment. I hope we are a blessing wherever we happen to be. I hope the love of Jesus is obvious to anyone who interacts with me. I hope the pain we experienced only magnifies the blessings we have received. 

Pain and Blessing—Painful Blessing. Sounds like the perfect title for a book.
_____________

If you want to have a copy of the downloaded,  go HERE!

I Bet You Can’t Wait for This!!!!

Yup…Jill is writing an Epilogue to her Painful Blessing story…and I decided to distribute it for FREE…No Charge…to you!

I know what you thinking…How could he forgo all that income from this Epilogue?  What can I say, it is just the way I am.

Don’t expect another book; it is truly an Epilogue.  You will fine out:

  • Am I getting better?
  • What has he gotten back?
  • Can he talk?
  • Will I go back to work?

OK, maybe you know some of the answers, but there are plenty of people who don’t. Of course, you can look at my video file to see the progress I have made so far. But the way Jill writes about her experience brings it to the next level.

This chapter has certainly become an Epilogue; it’s a final review…to date. Jill shouldn’t have a problem connecting with people.  It is the ONLY good thing about this: People now have the time  if they take a break from Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.

I don’t realize when I am having an impact…..

Impacting others is a theme I have when writing my blog posts.  Each post, I get an overview of how many people read my blog.  When I write something REALLY personal, I get a large number of readers…and I get personal emails of how I impacted that reader.  When I wrote about retirement a few days ago, I got this response and asked if I can use it in my blog.  She graciously said yes:

Gordon,

I met you and your sweet wife at a Portland Executives meeting a couple years ago or more.

I have enjoyed following your blogs and your journey.  I know you can’t speak but does the typing for your blog still bring you joy?  Your thoughts in the blog are an encouragement to so many I’m sure.  

I was treated a year ago for what was initially thought to be a stroke.  It didn’t turn out to be one however it was a migraine acting like a stroke.  Determined probable cause – stress. Imagine that.  I’ve really worked at becoming unhurried and learning how to relax and enjoy the moments in my life.  Patience does not come easily as you know.  I remember some years ago when my husband was dying of cancer I realized everything in life comes from inside ourselves and of course through God in our lives.  Yet it took me years to begin working on the inside.

It’s not that I don’t think you know any of these things, I have seen much of it in your blog.  I just wonder if you are looking too hard for fulfillment in retirement. Please forgive my thoughts if they intrude or are things you’ve already considered.  Retirement is for what we’ve longed for during our lives, time to give to others, time to study something that won’t make us any money but will enrich our soul.  

Think about what you want to retire from – that is important.  But keep the things that still feed your soul.  I will continue to keep you in my prayers as I think of you.  Keep up the good work, your life is an encouragement to others whether we can speak or not.  

With hugs, Jan

Did you ever feel like giving up?

If you did, read this note and the lessons learned  It was posted on Facebook and it really struck home with me…especially Tips 11,12 & 13. It really describes how we all should be. I hope you like it:

The telephone rang. It was a call from his mother. He answered it and his mother told him, “Mr. Belser died last night. The funeral is Wednesday.”

Memories flashed through his mind like an old newsreel as he sat quietly remembering his childhood days.

“Jack, did you hear me?”

“Oh, sorry, Mom. Yes, I heard you. It’s been so long since I thought of him. I’m sorry, but I honestly thought he died years ago,” Jack said.

“Well, he didn’t forget you. Every time I saw him he’d ask how you were doing. He’d reminisce about the many days you spent over ‘his side of the fence’ as he put it,” Mom told him.

“I loved that old house he lived in,” Jack said.

“You know, Jack, after your father died, Mr. Belser stepped in to make sure you had a man’s influence in your life,” she said.

“He’s the one who taught me carpentry,” he said. “I wouldn’t be in this business if it weren’t for him. He spent a lot of time teaching me things he thought were important. Mom, I’ll be there for the funeral,” Jack said.

As busy as he was, he kept his word. Jack caught the next flight to his hometown. Mr. Belser’s funeral was small and uneventful. He had no children of his own, and most of his relatives had passed away.

The night before he had to return home, Jack and his Mom stopped by to see the old house next door one more time. Standing in the doorway, Jack paused for a moment. It was like crossing over into another dimension, a leap through space and time. The house was exactly as he remembered.

Every step held memories. Every picture, every piece of furniture…Jack stopped suddenly…

“What’swrong, Jack?” his Mom asked.

“The box is gone,” he said.

“What box?” Mom asked.

“There was a small gold box that he kept locked on top of his desk. I must have asked him a thousand times what was inside. All he’d ever tell me was ‘the thing I value most,'” Jack said.

It was gone. Everything about the house was exactly how Jack remembered it, except for the box. He figured someone from the Belser family had taken it.

“Now I’ll never know what was so valuable to him,” Jack said.

“I better get some sleep. I have an early flight home, Mom.”

It had been about two weeks since Mr. Belser died. Returning home from work one day Jack discovered a note in his mailbox. “Signature required on a package. No one at home. Please stop by the main post office within the next three days,” the note read.

Early the next day Jack went to the post office and retrieved the package. The small box was old and looked like it had been mailed a hundred years ago. The handwriting was difficult to read, but the return address caught his attention.

“Mr. Harold Belser” it read.

Jack took the box out to his car and ripped open the package. There inside was the gold box and an envelope.

Jack’s hands shook as he read the note inside.

“Upon my death, please forward this box and its contents to Jack Bennett. It’s the thing I valued most in my life.” A small key was taped to the letter. His heart racing, as tears filled his eyes, Jack carefully unlocked the box. There inside he found a beautiful gold pocket watch.

Running his fingers slowly over the finely etched casing, he unlatched the cover. Inside he found these words engraved: “Jack, Thanks for your time! — Harold Belser.”

“The thing he valued most was my time!”

Jack held the watch for a few minutes, then called his office and cleared his appointments for the next two days.*

“Why?” Janet, his assistant asked.

“I need some time to spend with the people I love and say I care for,” he said. “Oh, by the way, Janet, thanks for your time!”

“Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take but by the moments that take our breath away.”

Think about this. You may not realize it, but it’s 100 percent true.

1. At least 15 people in this world love you in some way.

2. A smile from you can bring happiness to anyone, even if they don’t like you.

3. Every night, SOMEONE thinks about you before they go to sleep.

4. You mean the world to someone.

5. If not for you, someone may not be living.

6. You are special and unique.

7. Have trust sooner or later you will get what you wish for or something better.

8. When you make the biggest mistake ever, something good can still come from it.

9. When you think the world has turned its back on you, take a hard look: you most likely turned your back on the world and the people who love and care for you.

10. Someone that you don’t even know exists loves you.

11. Always remember the compliments you received. Forget about the rude remarks.

12. Always tell someone how you feel about them; you will feel much better when they know and you’ll both be happy.

13. If you have a great friend, take the time to let them know that they are great.

To everyone who read this just now….

*”Thanks for your time.”* ????