I Bet You Can’t Wait for This!!!!

Yup…Jill is writing an Epilogue to her Painful Blessing story…and I decided to distribute it for FREE…No Charge…to you!

I know what you thinking…How could he forgo all that income from this Epilogue?  What can I say, it is just the way I am.

Don’t expect another book; it is truly an Epilogue.  You will fine out:

  • Am I getting better?
  • What has he gotten back?
  • Can he talk?
  • Will I go back to work?

OK, maybe you know some of the answers, but there are plenty of people who don’t. Of course, you can look at my video file to see the progress I have made so far. But the way Jill writes about her experience brings it to the next level.

This chapter has certainly become an Epilogue; it’s a final review…to date. Jill shouldn’t have a problem connecting with people.  It is the ONLY good thing about this: People now have the time to offer their assistance if they take a break from Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.

I don’t realize when I am having an impact…..

Impacting others is a theme I have when writing my blog posts.  Each post, I get an overview of how many people read my blog.  When I write something REALLY personal, I get a large number of readers…and I get personal emails of how I impacted that reader.  When I wrote about retirement a few days ago, I got this response and asked if I can use it in my blog.  She graciously said yes:

Gordon,

I met you and your sweet wife at a Portland Executives meeting a couple years ago or more.

I have enjoyed following your blogs and your journey.  I know you can’t speak but does the typing for your blog still bring you joy?  Your thoughts in the blog are an encouragement to so many I’m sure.  

I was treated a year ago for what was initially thought to be a stroke.  It didn’t turn out to be one however it was a migraine acting like a stroke.  Determined probable cause – stress. Imagine that.  I’ve really worked at becoming unhurried and learning how to relax and enjoy the moments in my life.  Patience does not come easily as you know.  I remember some years ago when my husband was dying of cancer I realized everything in life comes from inside ourselves and of course through God in our lives.  Yet it took me years to begin working on the inside.

It’s not that I don’t think you know any of these things, I have seen much of it in your blog.  I just wonder if you are looking too hard for fulfillment in retirement. Please forgive my thoughts if they intrude or are things you’ve already considered.  Retirement is for what we’ve longed for during our lives, time to give to others, time to study something that won’t make us any money but will enrich our soul.  

Think about what you want to retire from – that is important.  But keep the things that still feed your soul.  I will continue to keep you in my prayers as I think of you.  Keep up the good work, your life is an encouragement to others whether we can speak or not.  

With hugs, Jan

Did you ever feel like giving up?

If you did, read this note and the lessons learned  It was posted on Facebook and it really struck home with me…especially Tips 11,12 & 13. It really describes how we all should be. I hope you like it:

The telephone rang. It was a call from his mother. He answered it and his mother told him, “Mr. Belser died last night. The funeral is Wednesday.”

Memories flashed through his mind like an old newsreel as he sat quietly remembering his childhood days.

“Jack, did you hear me?”

“Oh, sorry, Mom. Yes, I heard you. It’s been so long since I thought of him. I’m sorry, but I honestly thought he died years ago,” Jack said.

“Well, he didn’t forget you. Every time I saw him he’d ask how you were doing. He’d reminisce about the many days you spent over ‘his side of the fence’ as he put it,” Mom told him.

“I loved that old house he lived in,” Jack said.

“You know, Jack, after your father died, Mr. Belser stepped in to make sure you had a man’s influence in your life,” she said.

“He’s the one who taught me carpentry,” he said. “I wouldn’t be in this business if it weren’t for him. He spent a lot of time teaching me things he thought were important. Mom, I’ll be there for the funeral,” Jack said.

As busy as he was, he kept his word. Jack caught the next flight to his hometown. Mr. Belser’s funeral was small and uneventful. He had no children of his own, and most of his relatives had passed away.

The night before he had to return home, Jack and his Mom stopped by to see the old house next door one more time. Standing in the doorway, Jack paused for a moment. It was like crossing over into another dimension, a leap through space and time. The house was exactly as he remembered.

Every step held memories. Every picture, every piece of furniture…Jack stopped suddenly…

“What’swrong, Jack?” his Mom asked.

“The box is gone,” he said.

“What box?” Mom asked.

“There was a small gold box that he kept locked on top of his desk. I must have asked him a thousand times what was inside. All he’d ever tell me was ‘the thing I value most,'” Jack said.

It was gone. Everything about the house was exactly how Jack remembered it, except for the box. He figured someone from the Belser family had taken it.

“Now I’ll never know what was so valuable to him,” Jack said.

“I better get some sleep. I have an early flight home, Mom.”

It had been about two weeks since Mr. Belser died. Returning home from work one day Jack discovered a note in his mailbox. “Signature required on a package. No one at home. Please stop by the main post office within the next three days,” the note read.

Early the next day Jack went to the post office and retrieved the package. The small box was old and looked like it had been mailed a hundred years ago. The handwriting was difficult to read, but the return address caught his attention.

“Mr. Harold Belser” it read.

Jack took the box out to his car and ripped open the package. There inside was the gold box and an envelope.

Jack’s hands shook as he read the note inside.

“Upon my death, please forward this box and its contents to Jack Bennett. It’s the thing I valued most in my life.” A small key was taped to the letter. His heart racing, as tears filled his eyes, Jack carefully unlocked the box. There inside he found a beautiful gold pocket watch.

Running his fingers slowly over the finely etched casing, he unlatched the cover. Inside he found these words engraved: “Jack, Thanks for your time! — Harold Belser.”

“The thing he valued most was my time!”

Jack held the watch for a few minutes, then called his office and cleared his appointments for the next two days.*

“Why?” Janet, his assistant asked.

“I need some time to spend with the people I love and say I care for,” he said. “Oh, by the way, Janet, thanks for your time!”

“Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take but by the moments that take our breath away.”

Think about this. You may not realize it, but it’s 100 percent true.

1. At least 15 people in this world love you in some way.

2. A smile from you can bring happiness to anyone, even if they don’t like you.

3. Every night, SOMEONE thinks about you before they go to sleep.

4. You mean the world to someone.

5. If not for you, someone may not be living.

6. You are special and unique.

7. Have trust sooner or later you will get what you wish for or something better.

8. When you make the biggest mistake ever, something good can still come from it.

9. When you think the world has turned its back on you, take a hard look: you most likely turned your back on the world and the people who love and care for you.

10. Someone that you don’t even know exists loves you.

11. Always remember the compliments you received. Forget about the rude remarks.

12. Always tell someone how you feel about them; you will feel much better when they know and you’ll both be happy.

13. If you have a great friend, take the time to let them know that they are great.

To everyone who read this just now….

*”Thanks for your time.”* 😊

Another milestone appeared at my bible study…

Are you ready for this?

I don’t raise my RIGHT hand when I yawn!

I will back up for a minute.  When I first hand my stroke, the doctors said it was “normal” to raise my right arm every time I yawned. After 7 years, I sort of gotten used to it.  Even in church last Sunday, I raised my right hand after yawning (please don’t tell Paster Dave). Jill and I both laughed…and one of the congregants saw it and mentioned my hand raising.

Then last Thursday, when I was at my bible study (believe me, it is a coincidence), I yawned and I did NOT raise my right arm!  I don’t know about you, but this a MAJOR deal for me.  I practiced yawning the rest of the evening (when I returned home), and I didn’t raise my hand …ever!  I couldn’t wait to tell Jill about this.  She wanted to wait for the following week to see it was just a fluke.

So I agreed. If it is a fluke, I will edit my email before sending.  If not, you will get this one.

OK, I will say it again:  You don’t know how HAPPY I am; it will be almost 12 years since my stroke and I am STILL improving!!!!!

Side Note:  Did you click on the article that explained why my arm went up when I yawned?  I kept reading it, but got lost in the second sentence. I guess I know why I wasn’t a doctor!

Frustration…

I spoke to my contact a few days ago…and he couldn’t say enough positive things about my talk.  He brought tears to my eyes when he described his sister.  She had a stroke and she is resistant to working on getting better.

This hurts when I hear somebody tells me this.  It hurts knowing this loved one wants his sister to get better, but she refuses.  What can he do?  You can make suggestions, you can make it fun, and you can introduce games to make the exercises more interesting.

But when it is all said and done…. I am sorry to say it really is all up to the individual to WANT get better.  You can hope, wish and pray, but really that’s all you can do.  Don’t beat yourself up!

One last speech coming up for the year…

I have one more speech to do this year…and this will be my biggest to date.

The audience is the International DI  Society in San Diego. Not only does my wife gets to see her mother, the event is at the San Diego Marrioitt Mission Valley where we stayed before.

I am nervous because I am testing a new slide advance system. After a month of practice, I used the system for the first time last week…and it was a bit rough.

With this system, I hold the unit (on the right) in my pocket and advance the slide that way.  You would think it was easy, but it isn’t!  I always have to read my speech, but this time, I  got lost…twice!!  Since I was so focused on the slide advancer, I forget where I was.   I don’t know if people caught it; maybe they though it was part of my speech.

After reading the speech over 1000 times, I still have issues delivering it correctly.  I figure when I am great at delivering the speech, I will retire!

I could have wrote this article about something really cool!

I just read the article and the device looked like something really useful.  I will sign up for the free trial and let you know how it goes; fingers crossed!!  Check out the article:

“I was in the hospital and thought I’d better catch up on emails. I pulled out my phone and couldn’t read a thing. The nurse told me that the stroke had affected my vision and ability to read. When they brought in flashcards, and I couldn’t name simple things like a hammer or pencil, I cried. I realized my recovery was going to have to be my work,” said Patty Geer, Director of Finance, Hyatt Regency Orlando International Airport, and stroke survivor.

I was 51 and too young for the rest of my life to be over,” said Geer.

In June 2019, the American Heart Association released a study showing that working long hours for ten years or more is associated with stroke and that people under the age of 50 had a higher risk of stroke when they worked long hours for a decade or more. This is compounded by the trend of Americans working longer and retiring later.

Digital therapeutics and neurotechnology have the power to change how stroke victims recover, but with more Americans working longer, there’s a need to put recovery directly into their hands through digital therapeutic mobile apps.

For stroke survivors like Geer, getting back to work is more than a mental necessity, it becomes a financial one as well.

Constant Therapy is a mobile app from digital therapeutics company, The Learning Corp. The app is designed for people who have had a brain injury or cognitive disorder to give them direct access to clinical exercises that can rebuild their cognitive, speech, and language functions.

Built by neuroscientists and clinicians at Boston University in 2012, the Constant Therapy app digitizes therapy through a Neuro Performance Engine (NPE) that creates a highly customized and detailed map of each user’s strengths and deficits across 80 different categories.

The company says the program in the app delivers the optimum combination of exercises uniquely tailored to each user’s needs.

“The NPE in the app is self-learning and adaptive ability to produce new exercises is limitless. Every 3.5 seconds, a patient completes an exercise, teaching the program in the process,” said Michael Evers, CEO of The Learning Corp. “More than 100 million tasks have been completed by Constant Therapy users to date, allowing the NPE to discover new ways to improve individual tasks, fine-tune the sequence of therapies, and update current protocols, speeding up innovation in brain rehabilitation.”

Evers says that Constant Therapy moves recovery into the patients’ hands – giving them anywhere, anytime access to evidence-based exercises to help rebuild the brain.

“In a trial, patients with access to Constant Therapy did four times more therapy which resulted in a significant improvement in the patient,” added Evers.

A 2019 retrospective study published in Frontiers in Neurotechnology compared outcomes among patients using tablet-based therapy at home and those who complete the same therapy in a clinic. The study found that home users took less time to master tasks than users who only practiced in the clinic. Home users also practiced therapy more frequently than clinic users.

The app can be used by the consumer on their own or is available on referral by their clinician as a complement to in-clinic programs. Currently, Brooks Rehabilitation, Cleveland Clinic, Kaiser Permanente, Kessler Institute, Memorial Hermann, Shirley Ryan, and Spaulding Rehabilitation are using the app with stroke patients.

“The cost is $25 per month which is less than the cost of an average single session with a clinician,” added Evers.

“Our platform is powerful because it gives patients a more active role in their recovery [..] and it utilizes credible tech to impact patient lives in a measurable way,” added Evers. “This is a product that’s been developed around real patient usage and proven clinical recovery methods, making it a tangible application of technology versus a theoretical concept.”

Evers believes that traditional therapies developed decades ago just haven’t kept pace with innovations in health that can change the way people can now independently monitor their exercise, diet, and sleep.

“People want access to legitimate tools that help them manage their health,” added Evers.

After her stroke on Christmas eve in December 2017 which left her with cognitive and short-term memory challenges including aphasia, Geer was set on returning to her position as finance director at Hyatt Regency Orlando International Airport.

Geer says she worked hard to recover with the help of a speech-language pathologist alongside Constant Therapy which she says put her back at work only three months after her stroke.

“I looked at it like ‘this is my job now, getting better so I can get back to work,’ I called it homework,” said Geer. “It was something that I could do at home every day that makes you feel like you’re making progress because you can see it – the app helps move you along. It gave me a sense of accomplishment because I could see real advancement as I went through the exercises.”

Geer says the app was a natural fit for her since 75 percent of what she does every day at work is on a computer.

“Outside of work, I use my iPad and I would play Words with Friends and then open Constant Therapy; it felt like it was in my wheelhouse,” said Geer. “Until I used the app, I never would’ve thought this was something you could do that actually helped. Using tech in this way was an important part of my recovery.”

We ARE in sales….

OK, I liked the picture!  I was contacted by SalesPOP! a few months ago and thought that this would be interesting.  OK, I thought JILL would be interesting.

Welcome to another informative video of SalesPOP!
Here we are interviewing Gordon Viggiano who was an expert sales consultant, specializing in building and developing sales teams in small to mid-sized companies. He spent over 30 years of experience as a VP of Sales for a number of California companies. Gordon not only brought proven sales processes and means of success but also the “Big Picture” relationship between sales and the corporate structure. Here we will be talking about the following queries:
• When you faced such a life-changing dramatic event, it obviously becomes very tempting and easy to give up and disappear into the dark so what is it you both together actually turn it into something. How are you able to resist the temptation?
• Giving yourself rewards even if you are achieving small goals or overcoming small steps can help you and motivates you to perform well. Is it helpful?
• It is critical and true that things take more time than we predict at initial stages and people don’t have the patience to deal with that. So how to manage all that!
Sometimes people don’t know how bad they are and how badly things are going. They think that they are doing well and then there comes someone who told them that they suck at everything. So how to approach and guide somebody towards reality in a positive way! About

About SalesPOP!

It is a modern digital magazine, aimed at empowering sales leaders, sales management, sales professionals and entrepreneurs to achieve success. As a multi-media platform, we bring you to live sales expert interviews with top professionals giving you pro tips on how to be more successful in sales. View our online magazine for more written content, video, slideshares and infographics, e-publications and even free tools.
If you like watching this video, don’t forget to hit the LIKE button. To get more detailed knowledge on sales management and planning, subscribe to our channel and share this video with your friends and loved ones. Share your views or any query in the comment section below!
Find more sales pro advice by connecting with us:
Sales Professional Interviews: https://salespop.net/media/sales-expe…