Look at me…I am SOMEBODY!

Check out what NAHU has done from my career.  I know that it is up to ME to get exposure, but still….

NAHU Speakers Bureau – Speaker Information

Gordon Viggiano 
My Brain LLC
Wilsonville, OR
Work Phone: (503) 454-0887
Fax: (503) 855-5908
Chapter:
Web Site: http://www.mybrainllc.com
E-mail: gordon@mybrainllc.com
Video: View Now!

We were a typical family: we lived trying to do things right — working hard, providing for the family, following Christian values. On Gordon’s 51st birthday, out of nowhere, a terrible thing happened: he suffered a massive stroke! One might say we were dealt a dirty card, but we see it differently. The experience has been a true test of faith and perseverance.

Our journey of recovery is still in progress. Gordon is now 11 years post-stroke and we are happy to report that he is getting better all the time.  We will discuss this life changing experience and the lessons that have come along with it. Our hope is to inspire people and help them see that good things can happen, even when one doesn’t think it is possible. Gordon is certainly not fully recovered from his stroke so this isn’t an “I did it and you can too” speech. I am in the middle of my recovery and so my perspective is from “the trenches.” I am now the disability guru; a true stroke to success story!

Visit the My Brain LLC website for more information.

Most Requested Topics

  • Motivational
  • Disability

Speaker Reference:

Farren Baer 
Sr Vice President of Education & Professional Development
1212 New York Ave., NW  Suite 1100
NAHU
Washington, DC 20005
Work Phone: 844-257-099
E-mail:  fbaer@nahu.org

 

Oh no…another hospital stay?

IMG_0086

 NO… THANK GOD!!

This picture was taken yesterday at OHSU.  Thankfully, Gordon was in an actor in a training video, not a real patient in a hospital bed.  In their effort to keep patients, nurses, and therapists safe and unharmed, the good professionals at OHSU are creating videos on assessing patient mobility.  Gordon was an excellent choice as their subject.

Seeing him in that bed brought some serious flashbacks for me.  Even though I knew the scene was staged, I felt that old fear and dread rise up once again.  I was also able to reflect on Gordon’s wonderful progress and be thankful that we can now laugh with the staff and participate voluntarily in this scenario.

Being nearly 7 years post-stroke, I was also able to express my appreciation for the compassion and positive attitudes of the nurses and therapists.

Jill Viggiano

How did I miss that?

 

You wake up in a hospital, unaware of what happened. Your family and friends gather around to help you any way they can. Your family can’t make sense of what happened, so they see what is available on the internet.  That the problem!

You can’t find ANYTHING you need to do AFTER you had your stroke.

For me, that stroke was 7 years ago.  Now, 7 years later, it is different.  Now you can determine if your heart is stressing out..  You pay attention to FAST and you are aware of the stroke facts.  You have the signs, and your friends and relatives noticed it..and they tell you.

You may notice I DO have post-stroke examples of articles you CAN read.  OK, it’s 1, but it is a start: 5 Ways to Help Your Loved One with Receptive Aphasia  There will be MORE!

In the last 7 years, we have had major progress in stroke.  Now, stoke is the 5th leading cause of death in america..down from the 4th leading cause of death. That’s good news!