How Did I Do????

I was cleaning out my file and I discovered this sheet of paper:

It was the follow up I did with the audience I addressed.  I just wanted an idea of how it went and if I should be presenting this speech to anyone else.   I reserved the URL; I put in on hold incase I needed to do something after the speech.  I got so many positive reviews and so many names of people who would like to hear a similar message, that I launched my business a week later.  I told my partner, Scott, that I would be leaving his practice.  It was good timing for him, because his practice was exploding!

This is interesting: Back in 2012, I included pens with the hand-out; I didn’t know any better!   I wouldn’t do that today.  I would just hand them my questionnaire and collect them afterwards…like I do now.  I didn’t know it at the time, but most people have pens.

I am still getting 25-60% of the people filling those out.  When I said “go to my website and fill out the form, I got 2-3% of the audience to fill it out; who knew.  I thought the high tech thing would work–nope!!!!

I Am Back!

I Am Back…and ready to change the world!!!

OK, NOT ready to change the entire world…but ready to take on the daily challenges of running a business. I am rested and eager to start.

I just completed fifth my year in business.

I can not believe I have been doing this for over 5 years! It started out giving one speech to    all my friends and has evolved into a full time job.  OK, not really full time job because of me having to nap and because I can’t really speak in full sentences.  If they would only get beyond that….

This is tough for me to get used to…Not being able to communicate properly.  I have an idea, but I just can not put it into words.  You wouldn’t believe how frustrating that is. I read the Wall Street Journal daily, but it is hard for me to stay focused. After reading 2 paragraphs, I am ready to switch stories.

Then if asked about what I just read, I can’t get the words out to describe it. Like I said, is is frustrating.

But what REALLY keeps me going:

 

Comprehensive Speech Language Therapy Services

After a stroke, patients can experience a wide range of symptoms depending on where the stroke occurred in the brain and how severe it was.

Patients who experience facial paralysis and speech impairment after a stroke typically need ongoing speech therapy. At Memorial Regional Hospital, Speech Language Pathologist Joan Parnell works with doctors and patients to develop specialized treatment plans. The treatment begins by understanding the area in the brain where the stroke has occurred.

“Every patient is different, so it varies patient to patient,” Parnell said. “Their age, prior level of function, severity of CVA (cerebrovascular accident), and a patient’s motivation all have an affect on how the treatment is provided and the outcome of treatment.”

A stroke happens when blood flow to an area of the brain is cut off. Brain cells are then deprived of oxygen and begin to die.

“When brain cells die during a stroke, abilities controlled by that area of the brain, such as memory and muscle control, are lost,” according to the National Stroke Association.

When a stroke happens in the left side of the brain, the right side of the body is affected, and when a stroke happens in the right side of the brain, the left side of the body is affected.

The left side of the brain involves speech and language. The left frontal lobe, or Broca’s area, involves speech production. Impairment here usually means the patient can’t form words properly and has slurred or slow speech but can typically understand, she said. The left temporal lobe, or Wernicke’s area, is responsible for comprehension of language.

“When someone has facial paralysis, typically, a speech therapist would have the patient do exaggerated lip, face, tongue exercises, such as smiling, puckering of lips, protruding, lateralizing, and elevating tongue,” Parnell said. “The patient’s prior level of health, severity of CVA/TBI, and motivation/diligence of performing treatment tasks will affect outcomes. Speech therapy is just like any other task — if you don’t practice outside of the treatment room, then typically, your progress is not as great as someone who does.”

Beyond speech

Following any brain injury, some patients may experience depression and feel their intelligence has been taken away, Parnell said.

“I typically educate them that they haven’t lost their intelligence, but that a storm has come through their brain and damaged some of the lines/wires, like electrical and phone wires would be damaged in a bad storm,” she said. “They then need to perform therapy to improve the damaged wires of their brain. They may not only feel ‘dumb’ — as they often say to me — or they are embarrassed, so I celebrate the smallest successes to improve their confidence and keep building from there.”

Because these patients have experienced this storm within their brains, it’s important for friends, family and other caregivers to be patient. Parnell suggests keeping commands and directions simple, allowing the person plenty of time to communicate and not answering questions for them.

“Continue to treat them as a loved one, not as a patient.”

For more information about stroke treatment at Memorial Regional Health, visit memorialregionalhealth.com.

One more speech before the year ends…

The year was closing out…but I had one more opportunity to present my speech to MY insurance company.

But let me back up to when I met JR, my rep.  I met JR about 6 years ago.

He called me on the phone…4 years later…a cool-warm call at best.  He said he wanted to meet with me to discuss our Auto Insurance.  I had this company since 2001 and I didn’t like the service I was getting, so I agreed to meet.

He showed me what he had and he made a convincing case to switch…so I did. Since switching, I had to call JR one time for my daughters car. As soon as I called him, he picked up on the third ring and answered my question!  This was the service that I had been waiting for!!!  JR, you are the man.

Anyway, I made a luke warm call to HIM, and said I was looking to speak at one of their COMPANY events and do you think you can help. (OK, I think BIG.)  A few weeks passed and I got a call from Christi and she wanted me to speak at her upcoming sales meeting.   And Christi told me she lived on the same BLOCK as me (about 12 houses down)! I gladly accepted, but now I had to practice my speech again.

I thought “how hard came that be? I gave this speech over 500 times.” Well, it was hard.  The first time thru the speech, I was terrible!!!  Luckily, I had a few weeks to practice and I THINK I did ok.

I have to ask my wife Jill….to give me the truth…no holding back.  In the past, these were tough to hear, but I think this time, I gotten better.  I will ask her one the post is done…so she can’t change it!

No Shave November…only 2 more days left!!!

For more info, Click HERE

When you think of November, election season and Thanksgiving typically come to mind. This November there are bigger things to be concerned with other than who to vote for or what dishes to make for the big feast. To shave, or not to shave. It’s an important decision.

If you find yourself asking “What is no shave November for?” or “What does no shave November support?” you might want to do some research before shaving your face. The decision to shave or to not shave is a crucial one. So before you let your beard get a little native and type November No Shave in your calendar, you should take a look at the facts first.

DISCLAIMER:

We strongly encourage supporting cancer awareness and research. If participating in No Shave November is how you choose to do so, we do not discourage that! This post is simply to inform those who are considering whether or not participating is the right move for them.

WHAT IS NO SHAVE NOVEMBER?

This is when guys all across the country drop their razors for an entire month until December 1st rolls around. Some men view it as a competition to see who grows the best beard and others do it truly to support the cause.

MEANING OF NO SHAVE NOVEMBER

At some point in the last couple of years you have probably heard of “no shave November”. The whole purpose of no shave November is not to let your beards grow crazy, but to raise awareness for different kinds of cancer including prostate cancer. The goal is to donate the money you normally would use to get a haircut or groom your facial hair to St. Jude or other cancer research charities.

This is a great tradition but the real no shave November meaning and significance often gets lost among all of the jokes, hashtags and hype created by the media. Many men don’t even realize why they do it. Some use it as an excuse to not shave for a whole month. Although the no shave November cause of cancer is a great cause to support, there are other alternative ways to show your support.

NO SHAVE NOVEMBER ORIGIN

So, how did no shave November start? No Shave November started after a father in Chicago passed away from colon cancer. His 8 sons and daughters started this campaign in 2009 in honor of their father. Over 6 years this became a popular thing to do among many throughout the country.

There are a lot of things that people don’t tell you before you decide to participate in this official month of no shaving. From trends to setbacks and to just straight opinions. Even if you like facial hair on a guy, or as a guy it only goes to a certain point. No one likes beards or mustaches that look unkept. Many girls like a man with a well groomed beard, but if you happen to be one who doesn’t, chances are “No Shave November” is not your month.

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS TO NO SHAVE NOVEMBER?

1. YOU’RE SUPPORTING CANCER AWARENESS.

While you’re growing out your beard for the month, you’re likely to tell people about why you’re doing it. It’s a great conversation starter, and can really generate a huge conversation about cancer. It can get more people to make sure they’re getting regular checks for prostate cancer, breast cancer, melanoma, etc.

2. IF YOU’RE DOING IT RIGHT, YOU’RE DONATING MONEY TO CANCER RESEARCH.

To properly participate in No Shave November, you should be donating the money that you aren’t spending on razors and shaving accessories to a cancer research organization, such as the Prevent Cancer Foundation, Fight Colorectal Cancer, and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Don’t just participate in No Shave November to grow an awesome beard — make it worthwhile and donate the money you’re saving to cancer research!

3. YOU’RE GAINING HEALTH BENEFITS.

There’s more to growing out your beard than just getting a new look. There’s actually health benefits, too! A beard is a natural toxin filter — it keeps things like pollen and dust from getting into your lungs, because they’re clinging to your beard instead.

It can also help prevent blemishes. Shaving gives you a risk of getting bacteria into your skin, especially if you’re not using proper methods. Growing out a beard can combat this.

November is when the weather really starts getting cold, and a beard can act like a scarf for your face and neck. It’s really the perfect time to stop shaving!

Lastly, a beard can help with sun protection. Obviously you will still need to apply sunscreen, because hair isn’t going to block out 100% of the sun’s UV rays, but it’s been proven that a beard can block up to 95% of them! What better way to support cancer awareness than actually practicing it?

SO WHAT DON’T THEY TELL YOU ABOUT NO SHAVE NOVEMBER? WHAT COULD BE THE NEGATIVES?

1. NOT EVERYONE CAN PULL OFF OR GROW FACIAL HAIR

What about those people who can’t really grow facial hair? If you fall into this category you might already be disappointed that you can’t produce a macho beard. The disappointments will only continue when No Shave November comes around. We hate to break it to you, but no one wants to see a man that can only grow patches of uneven gross facial hair.

Let’s face it; not everyone looks good with a beard. They might not have the face shape or personality for a beard. Sure there is Movember where those who prefer to have a mustache instead of a beard can participate, but not everyone looks good with facial hair, PERIOD. For most women facial hair is only considered attractive when it is well kept and groomed and with No Shave November, that is not the case.

2. HIPSTER BEARDS AREN’T “IN”

For the longest time every man’s goal was to rock the hipster beard. You couldn’t go to a trendy coffee shop or hip restaurant without becoming lost in a crowd of wannabe lumberjacks. We don’t want to be the bearer of bad news, but it’s just not cool anymore. The time for hipster beards is long gone.

3. NO SHAVE NOVEMBER IS SEXIST

When it comes to no shave November women aren’t often participants. It’s all fine and dandy when a guy decides to put the razor into hibernation, but when a women decides to, suddenly “it’s gross”. We are all human so we shouldn’t have different expectations based on typical cultural roles and gender norms.

4. NOT EVERYONE CAN PARTICIPATE

Some jobs frown upon facial hair. For those guys with jobs that do not allow them to grow a beard, how do they show their support for this cause? Or maybe even the women out there who want to join the movement but are too scared of being judged? There are many people in the world who wish they could, but can’t.am

5. YOUR BEARD HAS POOP IN IT

Okay, maybe your beard doesn’t have actual poop in it, but multiple studies (KOAT & NY Post) have shown that your beard might be just as dirty as a toilet. Just because you wash your face or take daily showers does not mean that your beard is squeaky clean.

6. IT TAKES LONGER THAN 1 MONTH TO GROW A GOOD BEARD

Usually it takes months and months for any man to grow the most glorious, luscious beard that many women go crazy about. According to Beardoholic, a beard on average only grows half an inch per month. If you expect to grow a hip beard in just one month, you can take your so-called beard to the World Beard and Mustache Championships and see what they have to say.

7. IF YOU ALREADY HAVE A BEARD, YOU HAVE TO SHAVE IT

You have spent months and maybe years perfecting your beard. If you want to be a part of No Shave November, your hard earned beard will be history. One of the No Shave November rules is that you start out with a clean face. If you don’t feel like saying goodbye to the beard you worked so hard to get you are not able to do No Shave November.

In order to support the charity of cancer research there are other events, products and things you can do to make a difference. The whole reason for No Shave November is to raise money and awareness for cancer. Why can’t we just dedicate a whole month or host another event to do the exact same thing? An event where there are no rules, photos, memes, or other aspects that draw away from the original goal. Before you decide to start letting your hair grow for No Shave November, think about all of these reasons why you should not take part in No Shave November.

If you choose not to participate in No Shave November to raise awareness and money for cancer research in other ways, that’s great! But, you’ll probably need some quality razors to continue shaving with… right?

Well, what if we told you that you could purchase quality razors at an affordable price, while raising money for animal rescue? Yep, you’ll be able to keep your beard, raise awareness for cancer in other ways, AND donate money to an animal rescue organization! What could be better than that?! At 99 Cent Razor, we donate $0.99 of every order to START Rescue, an organization in California that re-homes animals that are in danger. Click here to check out what we have to offer!

IF YOU’RE PARTICIPATING IN NO SHAVE NOVEMBER AND WANT TO START STOCKING UP FOR DECEMBER:

Use the code NOSHAVENOV on our site to save 15% off your order! We want you to support cancer research, but also be prepared when the time to shave comes back around.

NO SHAVE NOVEMBER QUOTES

  • “Kissing a man with a beard is a lot like going to a picnic. You don’t mind going through a little bush to get there!” Minnie Pearl
  • “You can’t grow a beard if you shave” Bob Blue
  • “I grew my beard out a little bit just to show that, indeed, I am a man.” Johnny Weir
  • “I will never shave off my beard and moustache. I did once, for charity, but my wife said, ‘Good grief, how awful, you look like an American car with all the chrome removed.” Rolf Harris

NO SHAVE NOVEMBER MEMES AND IMAGES

Find a no shave November meme and prepare yourself for beards on beards on beards. There’s tons of funny no shave November pictures, memes and other things on the Internet that you can come across.

For more info, Click HERE

I only have TWO MORE DAYS!!!!!  I like like the beard…but I am happy it is coming off.

Love letters…

Love Letters

Posted by Lynn Bronikowski

“Hey Dave! Guess what the name of this song is that you are humming,” said Pataki. “Stayin’ Alive. No wonder you have it stuck in your head. You know about staying alive.”

Levy recalls hearing the song as background music while he did physical therapy following his stroke on June 9, 2015.

“That became his theme song,” said Pataki.

The couple were flying to their Hawaiian babymoon—a getaway before the birth of their daughter, Lilly—when Levy’s life took a threatening turn.

At thousands of feet in the air, Levy turned to his wife and asked, “Does my right eye look weird? I can’t see anything out of it.”

Pataki turned to her college sweetheart and asked, “Dave, are you having a stroke?”

“Maybe,” he replied before losing consciousness.

Within 30 minutes the plane made an emergency landing in Fargo, North Dakota, where Levy, a healthy 30-year-old athlete and surgical resident, was in a coma following a rare bithalamic midbrain stroke.

Five months pregnant and alone, Pataki outwardly appeared calm and composed at the hospital but her body was shaking and shivering in shock. Purchase the book HERE.

  

Pataki’s parents and in-laws soon arrived at the hospital—and her dad, former New York Gov. George Pataki—temporarily suspended his presidential campaign. Levy’s father—a neurosurgeon—was there to answer questions.

“At one point I asked my mother if I was going to be a widow, if my baby would grow up without ever knowing her father,” Pataki writes in her memoir, Beauty in the Broken Places (Random House).

The best-selling author of historic fiction was at her husband’s bedside when she decided to write daily letters to Levy to not only make sense of her husband’s stroke journey but to create memories for him.

“I thought I would write it all down and maybe someday he’ll read it and maybe someday our daughter will read it,” said Pataki. “These ‘Dear Dave’ letters were also for me because I needed to speak to my husband and he wasn’t there.”

The letters also became the basis for her first work of non-fiction.

“The book turned into something we did as a family,” said Pataki. “In some ways it was very healing for us to do it together.”

After four days in the Fargo hospital Levy was stable enough to be airlifted to Rush University Medical Center in Chicago—the very hospital where he had been doing his orthopedic surgery residency.

“I literally don’t remember the town of Fargo at all or being airlifted to Rush but those doctors saved my life,” said Levy of the healthcare team at Sanford Medical Center. “We typically learn about bithalamic strokes in med school and they are usually fatal. For me, I was young enough where I was able to recover. If this stroke had occurred 10 years later, I might not be here.

“The very challenging thing in stroke medicine is that no two strokes are the same,” said Levy. “Everybody is recovering differently and the brain is so many complex things that the manifestations of your injury are completely different.”

Pataki spent long hours at Rush, never wanting to leave her husband’s side. Over time she fed him, signed paperwork, tracked monitors and watched him struggle to take a few steps and say a few words.

“It was scary to see my brilliant husband’s body and mind kidnapped by this new helpless, disoriented foreigner,” Pataki writes.

She reflected back on an August day in 2010 when during a visit to the Pataki farm in upstate New York, the couple became engaged. The next day they found three four-leaf clovers which Pataki glued to a photo and gave Levy on their wedding day with a note that read: “Dear Dave, May we always remember how ‘lucky’ we are to have one another. Love, Alli.”

When she returned to their empty apartment, she wanted to throw that framed photo across the room but ultimately would come to write those words again while Levy lay comatose: “Dear Dave . . . I love you . . . I miss you . . .May we always remember how lucky we are.”

Now they were members of “the Club of the Bad Things,” coined by Lee Woodruff, wife of ABC News reporter Bob Woodruff, who suffered a traumatic brain injury in 2006 when a roadside bomb struck his vehicle while on assignment near Taji, Iraq. Woodruff wrote the forward in Pataki’s memoir.

“We became members of the Club of Bad Things,” said Pataki. “This (book) was really an experience that enabled me to connect with people both in my life and new people.”

One of the new people in their lives was Omar Lateef, MD, chief medical officer at Rush, who was the first to give the couple hope.

“He believed that Dave’s brain could heal, and that Dave’s recovery could be nothing short of our wildest hopes,” writes Pataki.

“Dave had youth on his side; he had neuroplasticity on his side,” said Pataki. “He had great rehab. Our life might not necessarily be the Plan A that we had planned on but we had every hope to expect that Dave would be a participating, thriving member of his family and in his life. We had to stay hopeful that the brain had this remarkable ability to heal.”

Levy transferred to inpatient rehab before heading home where he was lethargic and laid back—a far cry from his Type A personality which routinely had him putting in 15-hour days.

“When I asked Dave’s therapists about this, I learned that this apathy had to do with Dave’s still-inadequate executive functioning,” writes Pataki. “This was a tough place for us to be. He was lucid enough to resent my urgings (nagging, as he called it), but not sharp enough to initiate and take over all of his self-care.”

Pataki struggled in her roles of both wife and caregiver. Four months after his stroke, Levy was in the delivery room when their daughter, Lilly, was born. The couple last August welcomed a second daughter, Grace.

“As a caregiver you can go through therapy and you can see your loved one regain their ability to walk or run or go on the treadmill—those are great milestones,” said Pataki. “But there are so many unknowns—the invisible aspects of the injury that are just so excruciatingly painful.

“So I think it’s important to connect with others who are walking a similar road. Some of the most hope-giving moments for me were when I connected to other people—caregivers, survivors and advocates and said, ‘OK, I’m not the only one who has walked this road.’”

Levy chose not to return to his grueling medical residency and today works as a medical consultant, saying, “I really do feel like I’m 100 percent better. I had absolutely wonderful therapy and that is what made me what I am today.”

One year after his stroke he writes in an epilog to Pataki’s memoir that “gratitude is the first thing that comes to mind.

“It was certainly a scary experience to have almost died, but one positive I can unequivocally point to is that it has truly brought me closer to my entire family,” he writes. “My entire life is a second turn—a second look, a second attempt at trying to lead a happy and meaningful reality.”

As for Pataki, she writes, “Dear Dave, May we always remember how lucky we are to have one another.”

A Stroke at 9 years old?

By Heather Yowell

One minute I could make out fuzzy images moving around the ICU, and the next minute I was the one moving. What is happening? I demanded, but no one could hear me. I couldn’t talk …I couldn’t even move… and I was losing consciousness.

At age 9, I had a hemorrhagic stroke, a bleeding into brain tissue, and the result of a brain tumor. The tumor was growing into nerves surrounding the brain stem. A blood vessel had ruptured, and the time frame between onset of stroke and onset of treatment was closing fast. The next 90 minutes would be crucial in order to stop the bleeding and significantly reduce disability. It was within this time frame that I lost the childhood I had known, but I am eternally grateful for the life I gained.

For several months afterward, I could not talk — my only means of communication a spelling board. Regular speech therapy—first at the hospital and then at the children’s rehabilitation center—changed that, but progress was slow and there was a lot of frustration and anger.

There were little things I took for granted until they were gone. I had to learn everything again. I felt betrayed by my own body; my memory wiped clean. I couldn’t walk, talk, feed myself, or even roll over in bed without assistance. Between lengthy stays at the hospital of the University of Virginia and the children’s rehabilitation center, it took speech therapy, occupational therapy, recreational therapy, and several additional years of physical therapy to get me where I am today…a survivor.

For me the question was never “Will I walk again?” but rather “How soon before I get out of this wheelchair?” Persistence can go a long way, but I’d be lying if I said it wasn’t difficult. Now was the time to rebuild my life, to make use of the abilities I still had.

At that time, during the 1980s, medical technology was not as advanced as it is today, but the only option was surgery to remove the tumor growing into the delicate network of nerves and blood vessels that surrounded the brainstem. Mine was a surgery that would not have been possible 20 years earlier. If I survived, a 3 1/2-month ordeal would begin that would leave me struggling to make sense of the world.

It’s remarkable how the mind continues to function even when the body is barely functional. I knew my surroundings. Even as I lay helpless in the ICU, dependent on machines to monitor my heart rate and control my breathing, I knew I was there because of a brain tumor and the damage it had done. I just didn’t know how much damage.

How does a 9-year-old deal with the fact that she can no longer do ‘normal’kid stuff, like participate in after-school activities, go to the mall with friends, or even go on trips without having to plan beforehand for handicap accessibility? How do you explain to a child that the rest of her life will be governed by nerve damage? At the time did anyone know?

I needed answers. I needed to connect with others dealing with the same issues.

Recovery is a long, hard road to travel and sometimes there is no pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, but when I focused on the abilities I still had (even if they were once taken for granted) only then did I no longer see myself as victim, but rather as a survivor.

With nerve damage and a severe balance problem, grade school was a challenge, but after high school I went on to college. I graduated with honors from Shenandoah University where, relying on assistance for balance, I walked across the stage at graduation to receive a Bachelor of Science degree, for which my efforts earned me a standing ovation.

Now, at age 45, I can still see that girl, limp and helpless in the ICU bed. Turning back the pages of time, how could I explain to someone else, especially a child, that her life will be forever changed? I’d tell her, “Never give up. You will face new challenges, even struggles, but your hard work will inspire other people, and show them what it means to be a survivor.”

More About No-Shave November

             2017 Photo                                                                        2018 Photo

Thank god I look the same!!!

1. YOU’RE SUPPORTING CANCER AWARENESS.

While you’re growing out your beard for the month, you’re likely to tell people about why you’re doing it. It’s a great conversation starter, and can really generate a huge conversation about cancer. It can get more people to make sure they’re getting regular checks for prostate cancer, breast cancer, melanoma, etc.

2. IF YOU’RE DOING IT RIGHT, YOU’RE DONATING MONEY TO CANCER RESEARCH.

To properly participate in No Shave November, you should be donating the money that you aren’t spending on razors and shaving accessories to a cancer research organization, such as the Prevent Cancer Foundation, Fight Colorectal Cancer, and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Don’t just participate in No Shave November to grow an awesome beard — make it worthwhile and donate the money you’re saving to cancer research!

3. YOU’RE GAINING HEALTH BENEFITS.

There’s more to growing out your beard than just getting a new look. There’s actually health benefits, too! A beard is a natural toxin filter — it keeps things like pollen and dust from getting into your lungs, because they’re clinging to your beard instead.

It can also help prevent blemishes. Shaving gives you a risk of getting bacteria into your skin, especially if you’re not using proper methods. Growing out a beard can combat this.

November is when the weather really starts getting cold, and a beard can act like a scarf for your face and neck. It’s really the perfect time to stop shaving!

Lastly, a beard can help with sun protection. Obviously you will still need to apply sunscreen, because hair isn’t going to block out 100% of the sun’s UV rays, but it’s been proven that a beard can block up to 95% of them! What better way to support cancer awareness than actually practicing it?

No Shave November…

This is me on Day 7…

Can you believe it has been a year already? Can you tell this is me?  OK, it has only been a day! When I first started this, I thought it would be great not to shave for a month. Then as I went two weeks, I couldn’t wait for the time to end. I hated growing a beard…and that is why I do it!

Is there anything you hate…or dislike greatly? Cancer? Diabetes? Depression? Pain Managment? This is the time for you to do something about it!

WHAT IS NO SHAVE NOVEMBER?

This is when guys all across the country drop their razors for an entire month until December 1st rolls around. Some men view it as a competition to see who grows the best beard and others do it truly to support the cause.

MEANING OF NO SHAVE NOVEMBER

At some point in the last couple of years you have probably heard of “no shave November”. The whole purpose of no shave November is not to let your beards grow crazy, but to raise awareness for different kinds of cancer including prostate cancer. The goal is to donate the money you normally would use to get a haircut or groom your facial hair to St. Jude or other cancer research charities.

This is a great tradition but the real no shave November meaning and significance often gets lost among all of the jokes, hashtags and hype created by the media. Many men don’t even realize why they do it. Some use it as an excuse to not shave for a whole month. Although the no shave November cause of cancer is a great cause to support, there are other alternative ways to show your support.

NO SHAVE NOVEMBER ORIGIN

So, how did no shave November start? No Shave November started after a father in Chicago passed away from colon cancer. His 8 sons and daughters started this campaign in 2009 in honor of their father. Over 6 years this became a popular thing to do among many throughout the country.

There are a lot of things that people don’t tell you before you decide to participate in this official month of no shaving. From trends to setbacks and to just straight opinions. Even if you like facial hair on a guy, or as a guy it only goes to a certain point. No one likes beards or mustaches that look unkept. Many girls like a man with a well groomed beard, but if you happen to be one who doesn’t, chances are “No Shave November” is not your month.

Hello Gordon Viggiano,

Thank you for your donation to No-Shave November! Your generous gift helps support programs at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Prevent Cancer Foundation, and Fight Colorectal Cancer. All four of these foundations are making great strides to fight, research, and find a cure for cancer, each in their own unique way.

For tax purposes, please keep this email as your receipt.

Donor: Gordon Viggiano
Organization: No Shave November (Tax ID #473673254)
Date: 11-06-2018
Amount: $100

Hairy November,
The No-Shave November Team