I received this touching note. Are you turning 60? Read This!

I just amazing received this beautiful note.  Maybe I am thinking the right things?

Gordon,

I just read your post.  Sounds like you are asking the same questions many, many people ask when they turn 60.  There are no magic answers.

 

Have you ever thought that one gift your stroke gave you is time? Time to do your blog, time to be a grandfather, time to be a caring father,  time to volunteer, time to have quality time with your wife, time to exercise,  time to do presentations, time to pray, time to help Jill around the house, time to have fun, travel, etc.

 

Perhaps you need to think of yourself as retired……not unemployed.  Is this the life you planned and worked so hard for all those years.  No, but does real happiness come from our jobs or from  our personal relationships.  Only you can find your answer to that question.

 

Perhaps God has some plans for that time………another door to open…….other paths to follow.   If you ask, he will help you open the door.

 

The journey is the secret……..not the destination.

From someone still asking the same questions……..

I woke up again…and I am still 60!

I can’t stop thinking about this!  I am still 60 years old.

In reflecting… I had good intentions, but I haven’t helped anybody achieve their dreams. I look at this as a failure in life…if I can’t help others.

Now I am 60 with nothing to show for it…and I don’t have much time left!  But at least now, I am going to savor each moment with the time I do have left.

I asked my wife of 28 years: what happened to my big dreams? She answered that question with a kiss. Isn’t she a great wife?

I would like to give back to other struggling entrepreneurs. Can I show them how to succeed in sales? I have been out of sales for 10 years (a stroke thing). Do I still have what it takes?? I would like to do the things that people really want: all the ins and outs of sales. I would like to help them…no compensation…but with the fact that I was doing something nice.

Where do I start? Please call or write to me.

 

More about No Shave November…

1. YOU’RE SUPPORTING CANCER AWARENESS.

While you’re growing out your beard for the month, you’re likely to tell people about why you’re doing it. It’s a great conversation starter, and can really generate a huge conversation about cancer. It can get more people to make sure they’re getting regular checks for prostate cancer, breast cancer, melanoma, etc.

2. IF YOU’RE DOING IT RIGHT, YOU’RE DONATING MONEY TO CANCER RESEARCH.

To properly participate in No Shave November, you should be donating the money that you aren’t spending on razors and shaving accessories to a cancer research organization, such as the Prevent Cancer Foundation, Fight Colorectal Cancer, and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Don’t just participate in No Shave November to grow an awesome beard — make it worthwhile and donate the money you’re saving to cancer research!

3. YOU’RE GAINING HEALTH BENEFITS.

There’s more to growing out your beard than just getting a new look. There’s actually health benefits, too! A beard is a natural toxin filter — it keeps things like pollen and dust from getting into your lungs, because they’re clinging to your beard instead.

It can also help prevent blemishes. Shaving gives you a risk of getting bacteria into your skin, especially if you’re not using proper methods. Growing out a beard can combat this.

November is when the weather really starts getting cold, and a beard can act like a scarf for your face and neck. It’s really the perfect time to stop shaving!

Lastly, a beard can help with sun protection. Obviously you will still need to apply sunscreen, because hair isn’t going to block out 100% of the sun’s UV rays, but it’s been proven that a beard can block up to 95% of them! What better way to support cancer awareness than actually practicing it?

I am happy I’m not depressed!

Posted by Amy Norton, HealthDay Reporter

People with depression tend to die earlier than expected—a pattern that has grown stronger among women in recent years, new research finds.

The study followed thousands of Canadian adults between 1952 and 2011. Overall, it found people with depression had a higher death rate versus those without the mood disorder. The link only emerged among women starting in the 1990s. Yet by the end of the study, depression was affecting men’s and women’s longevity equally.

The findings do not prove that depression itself shaves years off people’s lives, said lead researcher Stephen Gilman.

The study could not account for the effects of physical health conditions, for example.
“So one explanation could be that people with depression were more likely to have a chronic condition,” said Gilman, of the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. But even if that were true, he added, it would not mean that depression bears no blame—because depression can take a toll on physical health.

“Many studies have found that people with depression have higher risks of heart disease and stroke, for example,” Gilman said.

The findings are based on 3,410 Canadian adults who were followed for up to several decades. The first wave of participants was interviewed in 1952, the next in 1970, and the final in 1992.

At each wave, roughly 6 percent of adults had depression, based on a standard evaluation.

And on average, those people had a shorter life span. For example, a 25-year-old man who was depressed in 1952 could expect to live another 39 years, on average. That compared with 51 years for a man without depression.

Men with depression at any point had a higher risk of dying over the coming years, versus those free of the disorder.

The picture was different for women, though. The connection between depression and mortality only surfaced in the 1990s.

Women with depression at that point were 51 percent more likely to die by 2011, compared with other women. That brought their risk on par with depressed men.

The reasons are unclear. “Why would depression be less toxic to women at one time point than another?” Gilman said.

He speculated that societal shifts have some role. Women in recent decades have been much more likely to juggle work and home life, or be single mothers, for example.

Another possibility, Gilman said, is that women tend to suffer more severe depression these days.

There was some evidence that the impact of depression lessened over time. Men with depression in 1952 no longer showed a higher death risk after 1968, for example—unless they also had depression at the later interviews, too.

As for causes of death, there was no evidence that suicides explained the risks among people with depression.

“There were actually few suicides,” Gilman said. “People with depression died of the same causes that other people did — like cardiovascular disease and cancer.”

Dr. Aaron Pinkhasov is chairman of behavioral health at NYU Winthrop Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. He said depression can indirectly shorten life span in a number of ways. Depressed people are less able to maintain a healthy lifestyle, and are more vulnerable to smoking and drinking. They may also be less equipped to manage any physical health conditions.

“Once depression sets in, you may not have the motivation or energy,” said Pinkhasov, who was not involved with the research.

Gilman said his study can’t say whether treating depression erases the higher death risk associated with it.

But, Pinkhasov said, there is evidence that depression treatment can help people better control high blood pressure and diabetes, for example.

He stressed that there are various effective treatments—from “talk therapy” to medication.

“Don’t blame yourself for being ‘weak,’ or tell yourself you should just snap out of it,” Pinkhasov said John Hamilton, a counselor at Mountainside Treatment Center in Canaan, Conn., agreed.

He said that women, in particular, can have a “sense of shame” over mental health symptoms in part because they feel they need to be the rock of the family. “They might even have people around them saying, ‘Snap out of it, you have kids,'” said Hamilton, who also had no role in the study.

“But depression is no different from any other chronic disease,” he said. “We need to have a compassionate, nonjudgmental approach to it.”

The results were published Oct. 23 in the journal CMAJ.

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Holy cow…I am 60!

I turned 60 at the beginning of the year…but I am NOW considering what that means.  What have I done with my life?

My father had a heart attack at 60 and died from another heart attack at age 62.  Did he teach others how to succeed in sales?   Did he mentor others to take risks?  Did he coach others that needed a coach?  The answer: No…but I am not doing that either!

When I was in my early 20’s, I was confident I would my successful, but it would take some time. So I spent my 20’s, 30’s, 40’s and 50’s putting the plan in place that would help me accomplish my goals.  Now I am 60, and where am I?

I didn’t accomplish any of my life changing goals!

But I did achieve my annual goals; I dated a lot, I got married to my beautiful wife, I raised 2 great kids, I went on nice vacations, I have a great home.  But did I accomplish anything significant? Not really.   OK, now that I think about it, I have accomplished a lot!

I have lived each day as if it were my last and I feel blessed with every remaining day.  After my stroke, I am content with what I have and find joy with the things that other people have.  I can’t explain it, but I think that defines happiness!

I started No Shave November!

Can you believe it has been a year already? Can you tell this is me?

OK, it has only been a day! When I first started this, I thought it would be great not to shave for a month. Then as I went two weeks, I couldn’t wait for the time to end. I hated growing a beard…and that is why I do it!

Is there anything you hate…or dislike greatly? Cancer? Diabetes? Depression? Pain Managment? This is the time for you to do something about it!

WHAT IS NO SHAVE NOVEMBER?

This is when guys all across the country drop their razors for an entire month until December 1st rolls around. Some men view it as a competition to see who grows the best beard and others do it truly to support the cause.

MEANING OF NO SHAVE NOVEMBER

At some point in the last couple of years you have probably heard of “no shave November”. The whole purpose of no shave November is not to let your beards grow crazy, but to raise awareness for different kinds of cancer including prostate cancer. The goal is to donate the money you normally would use to get a haircut or groom your facial hair to St. Jude or other cancer research charities.

This is a great tradition but the real no shave November meaning and significance often gets lost among all of the jokes, hashtags and hype created by the media. Many men don’t even realize why they do it. Some use it as an excuse to not shave for a whole month. Although the no shave November cause of cancer is a great cause to support, there are other alternative ways to show your support.

NO SHAVE NOVEMBER ORIGIN

So, how did no shave November start? No Shave November started after a father in Chicago passed away from colon cancer. His 8 sons and daughters started this campaign in 2009 in honor of their father. Over 6 years this became a popular thing to do among many throughout the country.

There are a lot of things that people don’t tell you before you decide to participate in this official month of no shaving. From trends to setbacks and to just straight opinions. Even if you like facial hair on a guy, or as a guy it only goes to a certain point. No one likes beards or mustaches that look unkept. Many girls like a man with a well groomed beard, but if you happen to be one who doesn’t, chances are “No Shave November” is not your month.

How Did I Do?


 

I THINK I did OK; at least my wife TOLD me she was proud of me!

When I got done, I felt kind of bad because I thought I could have done better.  But I am going to believe my wife; she is a good indicator of how I went.

I thought I would keep trying to develop way to get more people to sign up for my blog.  I tweaked the response.  This is what I did.  After Jill was done talking. I told the attendees to get out their phones.  The I said to enter  mybrainllc.com/ipad

They would land here:
I instructed them to fill out there name, and emails address if they want to get my blog. Then I said,  “But wait, there is more!”  I told them they could get an iPad mini if they gave me the name, email address and phone number of someone who would like to here more about this talk.  If they hired me, I would sent then an iPad mini.  This time I had 2 out of 50!  But when I got home, I added another 8 that logged onto my site.

I think I will go back to my OLD method, which was a clip board where they just put their email address.  I have consistently gotten 30-50% from the audiences who heard me speak!

When I call this client this week, I will let you know how I did.

BTW: My wife took this picture from the back of the room.  It is funny; notice how many people are sitting in the back??

I still have to practice!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am planning for my last speech of the year.

You know that I practice for a few weeks before giving EVERY speech.  Last Friday, I was absolutely amazing;  I has the audience (me) in tears!  I hit every slide, I paused in the right places; I really was fantastic.

Today, I thought “why do I need to practice again?  I given this same speech over 500 times.  Maybe I should stop.  I know, I will just give it one last time.”

So I did….and I was horrible. It was as if I was giving the speech for the first time.  I would say a few sentences, but then would be stuck to fine my place.  It was a real wake up call for me.  I really do have to practice this speech!  

It was so humbling to realize that I put EVERYTHING into speaking; I just don’t wing it. So, it is back to practicing!

 

Good News – Bad News

Posted by Steven Reinberg, HealthDay Reporter

While progress is being made in reducing the number of stroke deaths, it seems that more people who experience these brain attacks have significant stroke risk factors, a new study reveals.

The rates of high blood pressure, diabetes, abnormal cholesterol, smoking and drug abuse have all been on the rise in stroke patients over recent years, the study authors said.

The study included over 900,000 people hospitalized for stroke between 2004 and 2014. Each year, prevalence of high blood pressure went up by 1 percent, diabetes rose by 2 percent, high cholesterol went up by 7 percent, smoking increased by 5 percent, and drug abuse jumped 7 percent, the researchers found.

“The risk of dying from a stroke has declined significantly, while at the same time the risk factors are increasing,” said researcher Dr. Ralph Sacco. He’s a professor of neurology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

“We are not exactly sure why these increases are occurring,” Sacco said.

It’s possible that doctors are getting better at diagnosing risk factors. Or certain lifestyle factors may play a role, Sacco suggested. These include obesity, lack of exercise, poor diet and smoking.

The increase of drug abuse among younger patients is especially concerning, he added.

Although the increases in risk factors were seen in all racial and ethnic groups, increases in high blood pressure among blacks and diabetes among Hispanics stood out, Sacco noted.

He stressed that patients need to know their blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol levels. “There are great medications that can be used to treat those conditions,” Sacco said.

“We need to go further in controlling risk factors, like diet and exercise,” he advised.
According to Dr. Salman Azhar, director of stroke at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, “The challenge now is to prevent strokes, and if they have had a stroke, trying to prevent a second stroke. This is where the importance of these risk factors comes in.”

The responsibility to reduce risk factors lies with patients, but also with the community, he continued.

“It’s up to communities to provide access to better food and places to exercise. We have a responsibility as a community and a health system,” Azhar said.

The 922,000 people included in the study had been hospitalized for an ischemic stroke, which is caused by a blocked blood vessel in the brain. These are the most common types of stroke.

The number of stroke patients who had one or more risk factors increased from 88 percent in 2004 to 95 percent in 2014, the findings showed.

For hospitalized stroke patients during the 10-year study period, high cholesterol rates more than doubled, from 29 percent to 59 percent, and the rate of diabetes went from 31 percent to 38 percent.

In addition, high blood pressure rates increased from 73 percent to 84 percent, and the prevalence of drug abuse doubled from 1.4 percent to 2.8 percent. Also, kidney failure increased each year by 13 percent, and plaque buildup in the carotid (neck) arteries rose by 6 percent each year, the investigators found.

Dr. David Katz is director of the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center in Derby, Conn. He said the improvement in stroke survival “suggests we are relying on advances in treatment while neglecting prevention.”

Katz, who is also president of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, said, “Treating disease is never as good as preserving health and vitality. This study is a precautionary tale of the questionable and costly choices we seem to be making as a culture.”

The report was published online Oct. 11 in the journal Neurology.

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

How Did I Do at University of Portland?

 

 

 

 

First thing: I spoke THREE times in one day; I have never done that before!  This was another milestone for me.

I love the University of Portland because I can deliver the same speech, varies ways, to test certain things out.  But THIS time, I delivered the SAME speech, the same way, to all three groups to see if there was any variation in the way certain people view my presentation.

You would think if I didn’t do anything different, all threes groups would behave the same way.   WRONG!  Each of the three groups behaved differently!

To me, I was blown away. How could three groups be so different?I gauge the groups by the laugh I get at the beginning.  If they don’t laugh, I know it will be a tough group.

All three group responded the same way to my questions before I ask before the speech.  I thought if I started with these questions, I would urge them to listen.

I worked up to my first laugh:

I was a young, healthy, active, non-smoking, non-drinking- mostly non- drinking – normal cholesterol man,….. just like this guy! (point, Laugh)

 

 

 

 

 

There were no laughs!   I looked at Jill, thinking I didn’t say my line write.  Nope…I said it correctly!  So I continued on, with maybe a chuckle  or two at a few points. Then at the end, they asked a bunch of questions!  Were they the same group that heard my talk?

Then I had the second group.  They REALLY loved the picture!  I had to wait before I could continue because they were laughing so much!  When the end came, they didn’t ask ANY questions…but they stated to thank me…and we had to give another book to someone who didn’t look like she was paying attention but she was actually moved by my talk!

The third group had a few chuckles.  They asked a few questions at the end.  You never know what kind of impact you will have on a group until the very end of the talk, when they are leaving the room.

It must be tough being a stand up comic!